Review: OCDaniel

image is a blue book cover with numbers written all over it, some crossed out... The title "OCDaniel" is in black text over a q-tip with yellow hair and a hand-drawn face.

Genre: middle grades contemporary

Release date: April 12, 2016; this book is probably at your local library!

Synopsis: Daniel is a young teen who is struggling to find his place in the world — to find his friendships, to find his place in class and on his football team, to navigate early romance… Add to all the typical teen self-discovery, he also struggles with high levels of anxiety and needing to complete intricate routines to stave off those fears. And then Daniel meets Sara, who needs his help to solve the mystery of where her father is. Sara, who is honest about her own journey with mental illness.

Disabilities represented: primarily focused on obsessive-compulsive disorder, but also discusses depression, schizophrenia, and other mental illnesses

Note: The author has obsessive-compulsive disorder and writes about the autobiographical components of this story in his author’s note at the end of the novel. I’ve included a major spoiler at the end of this review, with a warning if you would like to avoid it.

Overall: 5/5 stars.

Review:

“Then there is only dread—the kind that sits on your back and claws at your head and doesn’t let you see happiness or hope or anything.”

I loved this book. Loved. King captures the internal feelings that come with compulsions so well that you may feel them in your own stomach. He captures the desperation, the feeling different, the confusion when they first begin. The way they cannot, cannot be ignored. He captures it all — but he does so without adding to the shame and stigma that our world so often perpetuates. If anything, over the course of the novel, he slowly peels back that shame that readers may feel as he peels it back from Daniel.

My favorite, though, is Sara… Sara lists her labels with nonchalance, as if they are just part of who she is. Sara, who talks about medication and therapy and how helpful it can be to know who you are. Sara, who shows that you can have mental illness and be brilliant and loving and brilliant. Sara, who shows that true friendship is. Sara takes the novel from a 4 star to a 5 star for me.

The one element that didn’t really hit home for me was Daniel’s short story excerpts. Periodically throughout the novel, we read Daniel’s own writing about a boy who feels alone. I understand the intention behind these pieces, but they really interrupted my reading flow. Others may find that they add to the emotional nuance.

Be sure to read the author’s note at the end. I appreciated King contrasting true OCD with the colloquial “I’m so OCD” that everyone throws around. It’s not the same.

MAJOR spoiler ahead:

One warning — Sara’s dad disappeared because he committed suicide due to depression. It is not idealized or made pretty in the way that a book like Thirteen Reasons Why does. And I don’t think the book should be avoided. I do think parents may want to use that as a conversation starter with their children. While this is especially true if you, like me, parent a child with mental illness, it is something that we can all discuss more with our children. They need to know the early signs of depression, where to go for help, and what to do if they feel like that. Teenage suicide is on the increase, at the highest number it has been in 20 years. We need to be proactive in giving our children the skills and supports that will help decrease their risk.