Review: Roll With It

Genre: Middle Grades Contemporary

Release date: October 1, 2019

Synopsis: Ellie is a young girl with cerebral palsy who uses a wheelchair to navigate through life. She and her mom move to her grandparents’ small town to help her grandmother care for her grandfather, who has dementia. Ellie also has to navigate new school, new town, and new friends while on the quest to bake the most perfect pie.

Disabilities represented: Ellie has cerebral palsy, and one of her friends is autistic. Her grandfather has dementia.

Warning: some bullying of Bert by classmates, but no graphic descriptions

Disclosure: I received the paperback of Roll With It as a free ARC when I attended BookCon 2019. I also received digital access to the ARC in exchange for my review, which was also shared on both NetGalley and Edelweiss.

Review:

I had a lot of conflicted feelings when reading Roll With It, which is why it’s taken me a week to post this review. I’ll start with what I love: Ellie is a whole person. It seems like something that shouldn’t need to be said, but it does. Too many books featuring characters with disabilities use those characters as props to make friends & family feel good. Ellie is not one of those characters. She is her own person. She has her own dreams and desires. She makes mistakes. She and her friends get in fights. She is a tween girl, living in a complicated situation.

On the flip side, Ellie has a lot of moments where she basically thinks or says “my disability sucks” or when she daydreams of not needing a wheelchair. Those feelings are real. I get that. I remember being a teenager who was different. I didn’t use a wheelchair, but I had my own invisible disabilities that were hard enough. I spent a lot of time trying to fit in. I know this part of the story is very, very real. But I worry that often THIS part of the story is the only part that is portrayed in our media. I worry about where that leaves kids reading about cerebral palsy, possibly for the first time, and how it can lead to pity and ableism.

However, I find that Ellie’s baking and her friendships come together with this piece of the story to balance the narrative. There is “this sucks”, but there is also “I’m Ellie, I have CP, and I am going to live my best life.” There are plenty of moments that make clear that a HUGE part of “this sucks” is other people sucking. Other people not providing accommodations. Other people making assumptions. Other people being jerks. And that’s important, because people need to know that they can do better to build a world inclusive of all. All those feelings of internal conflict, that processing — that’s the most real part of the story for me.

At times, the pieces of the story can feel disjointed, yet all of them are important. They all contribute to that feeling of fullness — to the knowledge that Ellie is… well, Ellie. She is a girl who is struggling with a grandparent who may not be safe at home. She is a girl who is struggling to find her autonomy from her mom, as many tweens and teens do. She is a girl who loves to bake. She is herself, and that’s what makes this book work for me.

One last thought — I understand that people make judgments about people with disabilities based off what they see. They shouldn’t do that. I do think that authors, in general, can do a better job of making this point without the, “But I don’t have an intellectual disability!” line. This pops up in several books about physical disabilities, and really deserves its own post. Because I worry that we accidentally dehumanize people with intellectual disabilities, that we accidentally are saying “but if I did have an intellectual disability”… The reality is that we shouldn’t speak like that or think like that about anyone. Regardless.

Overall: I would recommend for a read-aloud in an elementary school class or for adding to your school library. I think there are really powerful elements that are worth discussing, especially in the friendships that are formed (and the way classmates treat both Ellie & Bert, who is autistic).

I am planning to send this book to my friend, Taylor, and I’ll be sure to post her review or a conversation between us about it once I do! Books are better when shared and discussed.